A mural depicting a girl with a peculiar fish head, as she extends a welcoming hand up for a fish making its way to her hand. All stories

JEDARIART: Meet the Artists – Part Two

Updated 31 May 2022

In the second of the two-part series, a chance to hear from the the artists who, in early 2021, brightened the walls of Doha with their unique public art installations.

In part one of this two-part series we met the first group of artists to have adorned the walls of Doha with the murals that make up JEDARIART – Qatar’s latest public art programme.

Work on the murals took place in December 2020 with one clear goal – to bring together local artists to add vibrancy and meaning to the walls across the city through murals and street art. We caught up with the artists to discuss their work.

A mural that depicts a geometric set of adjoining Arabic calligraphy taken from a prayer which translates to "And say, oh my Lord increase my knowledg

Al Anoud Al-Ghamdi, Arabic Calligraphy Taken from Prayer, Qatar National Library Metro © Qatar Museums 2020

Al Anoud Al-Ghamdi

Al Anoud Al-Ghamdi is a Qatari and calligrapher who seeks to spread the message of authenticity, heritage, unity and peace through Arabic calligraphy in a modern and artistic way. Her work for JEDARIART depicts a geometric set of adjoining Arabic calligraphy taken from a prayer which translates to: And say, oh my Lord, increase my knowledge. The mural is set beside the metro station at the Qatar National Library, emphasising the meaning of the words.

From the artist: Art and calligraphy are essential elements of my life and define me today in many different shapes and forms – resembling my main form of expression. I wanted to showcase the beauty and power of Arabic calligraphy in a modern way using geometric art. I'm hoping through my work people will be able to view the power of Arabic calligraphy in a modern style.

A mural of a person trying to hold their head above water.

Dimitrije Burgarski, Part of Psychological Series, Fire Station © Qatar Museums 2020

Dimitrije Bugarski

Dimitrije Bugarski is a Serbian mural and visual artist who obtained a Master's degree in Architecture from the University of Novi Sad, Serbia, in 2011. His work in JEDARIART is part of his series that focuses on the psychological aspects seen in all of us, in this case trying to visualise dealing with hardships abstractly. The work depicts a semi-abstract figure holding up its head above the water. Using vibrant colours, Dimitrije is able to achieve a balance between a deep subject matter with the inclusion of fun, vibrant and pop colours.

From the artist: When people see my work, I hope they are encouraged and unafraid to try new things. Besides, my work is located at the Fire Station adjacent to the street for all to see. I believe the Fire Station is the epitome and hub for artists. Almost like the saying goes ‘all roads lead to Rome’, I believe that all the roads in Qatar lead to the Fire Station.

A mural showing the journey of fragment memories through time as torn papers.

Muna Al-Bader and Sharefa Al-Mannai, Flow Through the Time, Doha Expressway © Qatar Museums 2020

Muna Al-Bader and Sharefa Al-Mannai

Muna Al-Bader and Sharefa Al-Mannai are Qatari artists who have collaborated together in the making of their JEDARIART mural. Their work, entitled Flow Through the Time, is located on Doha's Express Highway. The mural represents a journey through time as torn papers; the fragments of memories of both artists, in which having fun included constructing paper planes.

From the artists: We decided to represent a fragment of our childhood since we wanted to convey how the past remains a beautiful place that will never return but will always stay with us. The paper planes we used to make when we were young are still things we make today to entertain ourselves. Since our mural is located on Doha's Express Highway, we hope people who drive by will be able to get a quick glimpse of the beautiful journey of the past.

A mural that depicts a hand turning a new page, representing how Qatar is "turning" towards a positive future.

Thamer Al-Dosari, Hand Turning a Page, 5 / 6 Flyover © Qatar Museums 2020

Thamer Al-Dosari

Thamer Al-Dosari is a Qatari artist who engages in fine art, graffiti art and calligraphy art. His work for JEDARIART is located in the 5 / 6 flyover and depicts a hand turning a new page, representing how Qatar is "turning" towards a positive future. This is also emphasised by Thamer's incorporation of a wrinkled page, suggesting the past, in contrast to the brightness of the wall next to it, which suggests a utopian future.

From the artist: My inspiration was mainly driven by the Gulf Blockade that occurred in 2017. Although I was restricted not to depict certain figures or flags, having it placed under the 5 / 6 flyover (which was constructed due to the blockade) enhances my mural's metaphorical message to suggest how Qatar is striving towards a better and positive future, hence the hand turning a new page.

A mural depicting a girl with a peculiar fish head, as she extends a welcoming hand up for a fish making its way to her hand.

Huda Basahal, Be Like a Fish, Fire Station © Qatar Museums 2020

Huda Bashal

Huda Bashal is a Qatari artist whose aim is to create art that is dreamy yet cheerful. At its core, Huda describes her work as an intersection between abstract and realism. Her work for JEDARIART, entitled Be Like a Fish, is set upon a blue roundel shape depicting a girl with a peculiar fish head. It emphasises the circumstances of life, how one must 'go with the flow', like a fish flowing within its waters. 

From the artist: My inspiration is mainly derived by two things, my feelings and subconscious, and my love for reading meaningful quotes. I decided to approach JEDARIART with this mural as I wanted viewers to delve into a sort of surrealist spectacle. However, my work is open for interpretation, and I really hope it works in different ways for viewers, whether they get a sense of relaxation by the deep blue colours or a sense of euphoria.

A mural depicting various cartoon figures seemingly stacked upon one another while riding a bike.

Aisha Al-Fadhala, Creatures, Fire Station © Qatar Museums 2020

Aisha Al-Fadhala

Aisha Al-Fadhala is a Qatari artist and designer, best known for her bright, vibrant and colourful artworks. Her work for JEDARIART, located at the Fire Station, depicts various cartoon figures seemingly stacked upon one another while riding a bike.

From the artist: Disney has been a major part of my life since childhood. When I was young, I would create my own character for each cartoon show I watched. I guess it's an aspect that grew with me. First, I enjoy making random shapes and lines that slowly form into a creature then see where it would take me as I go. I wish for people to enjoy my work and have fun engaging with it simply.

A mural depicting a Qatari woman figure in a cubist fashion

Shuaa Al-Kuwari, Mother, 5 / 6 Park Control Room © Qatar Museums 2020

Shuaa Al-Kuwari

Shuaa Al-Kuwari is a Qatari artist who explores different forms of artistic expressions, including Cubism. Her work in the 5 / 6 Park Control Room depicts a Qatari woman in a Cubist fashion, adorned with golden jewellery and wearing a traditional dress. 

From the artist: My inspiration for this mural was my mother’s face that I always enjoyed drawing. I did not merely want to focus on Cubism but also touch on elements such as modernity and symbolism. I believe the site is perfect for my mural as it counterbalances the gathering of the children in the park under their own mother's care. I hope my work honours all the mothers who strive for their sons and daughters towards the best in life.

A mural depicting a man in thobe writing the words "money can't buy dreams.”

Maha Al-Jaidah, Money can't buy dreams, Abdulla bin Hamad Al-Attiyah District © Qatar Museums 2020

Maha Al-Jaidah

Maha Al-Jaidah is a Qatari artist who enjoys working on spaces, interiors, product/industrial design, and graphic/digital art. Her contribution to JEDARIART addresses the common stereotype that Arabs buy their way through life, which is why she chose to depict a man in a thobe writing the words "money can't buy dreams". Maha contrasts the brick wall of an "old neighbourhood" with Doha's skyline as its background.

From the artist: I wanted to create a mural that we usually don't see around Doha, where it approaches stereotypes by using common graffiti styles, brick wall, graffiti-style text. My work was inspired by Banksy, and I wanted it to be straightforward, yet have a strong message. I aim to get people to talk and debate about the subject and question whether they agree or disagree with such stereotypes.

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