An Adidas Master Blaster cricket bat with the name Sachin Tendulkar and a signed dedication that says "To Asad Rauf, Best Wishes, Sachin Tendulkar" All stories

Collection Highlight: Sachin Tendulkar’s Master Blaster

28 June 2022

By Victoria Cosgrove

The 3-2-1 Qatar Olympic and Sports Museum (QOSM)’s Hall of Athletes collection features a cricketing great.

As part of its mission to research, collect and share the story of global sport, QOSM has curated a collection of objects from some of the most notable historic moments and distinguished personalities in sport history.

One of the glistening jewels in the museum’s collection crown once belonged to none other than Sachin Tendulkar – the world’s pre-eminent ambassador to the game of cricket.

Tendulkar is one of the most decorated batsmen in cricket history and is still considered by many as the greatest of all time.

Bird's eye view of Sachin Tendulkar's Adidas Master Blaster bat.

Photo: Mohammed Faris Edakkunimal, courtesy of Qatar Museums ©2022

The bat synonymous with his name is part of QOSM’s Hall of Athletes collection: a match-used Adidas ‘Master Blaster’ signed by Tendulkar while a member of the Mumbai Indians (2008–2013). The front and back of the bat feature the ‘ST/Sachin Tendulkar’ emblem.

But his batting technique is only part of what sets Tendulkar apart. At 16 years old he became India’s youngest international Test cricketer – the lengthiest form of the sport and often referred to as the most challenging for players.

In 2005 Tendulkar became the highest century maker – scoring 100 runs in a single innings – in Test cricket. The clincher was when he scored his 35th Test century against Sri Lanka. Six World Cups and one coveted championship trophy (2011) later, he still holds this century record, even after his retirement, with 51 Test centuries to his name.

Sachin Tendulkar's Adidas Master Blaster bat featuring the iconic ST emblem.

Photo: Mohammed Faris Edakkunimal, courtesy of Qatar Museums ©2022

Affectionately known as the ‘Little Master’ because of his relatively short height, Tendulkar will forever be recognised as one of cricket’s greats and a giant in his own right.

The bat is on display in QOSM’s Hall of Athletes, nestled among other objects of significance to the world of sport, underlining the museum’s mission to inspire and unlock athletic potential in Qatar.

Victoria Cosgrove is Curator of the Olympics Gallery at 3-2-1 Qatar Olympic and Sports Museum.

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